May 25, 2019

Six Ways to Record Your Claim Successes

Here is a success habit that claim professionals can cultivate:  keep track – on paper or on (backed up) hard drive – of your job accomplishments year-round.  Capture and record your professional successes.

This comes in handy when you have your annual performance appraisal.  It can also be useful if you ever ask for a raise, a promotion or tune-up your resume.  The utility goes beyond your current position, whether you are a trainee adjuster, a seasoned adjuster, Claims Manager or Vice President of Claims.

Future employers or prospective employers are bound to ask questions like, “What do you consider your three biggest professional accomplishments?”  If you systematically catalog your entire inventory of job-related successes – from the small to the significant – chances are that nothing will fall through the proverbial cracks in your memory.  Then, you can cujll through, picking and choosing the ones that stand out.

The temptation, though, is to wait to conduct this inventory until just before your annual review is coming up, or when you need to freshen up your resume due to a layoff.

This rarely works.

If you wait till the end of the year, you’re unlikely to remember them all.  So instead, follow these steps:

1.  Write it down!  Keep a running tab.  Do it while it is still fresh in your mind.

2.  Go digital.  Set up a computer file of kudos and accomplishments.  Add to it regularly.

3.  Be regular.  Put on diary, or “tickler” a reminder to update this “success list” periodically, perhaps every month.  You can use software tools such as Microsoft Outlook to remind you to perform certain tasks like this on a recurring basis.

4.  Focus on outcomes, not efforts.  Working ten hours a day instead of eight may show your industriousness as a claims person, but what good is it by itself?  This leads to the next tip.

5.  Emphasize “deliverables” and quantifiable metrics:  files closed, average payment per case, file turnover, projects and ideas that saved time, money or which improved client/customer service.

6.  Look inward for operational gains.  Cite ways that you have improved internal claim operations:  for example, training and orientation of new hires, using Internet job search resources to fill openings instead of expensive recruiters, creating a new internal claims training module or career development sessions for the adjusting staff, etc.

In many cases, the boss may come to you before your performance review to ask you to self-assess your job accomplishments over the past year.  See this as a prime opportunity to catalogue your achievements.  Many may have otherwise escaped the boss’ notice.  Or maybe they received the boss’ notice, but are now forgotten in the crush of business.

If you have been keeping track, then this is not a stress-inducing request.  It certainly helps answer any question along the lines of, “What have you done for me lately?”

It is also a useful discipline, even in the absence of any boss-generated request.  If you can’t think back to how you’ve added value to your department, company or work team recently, you had better get cracking.

Now, if anyone asks, “What have you done for me lately?” you are ready with a detailed answer!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

 PERSONAL NOTE:  The Claims Coach is in the process of moving and relocating to the Richmond, VA area during the week of June 18th.  As a result, there may be a few week’s hiatus until the next blog posting.

Comments

  1. Rosemary Silva says:

    Is there a specific template recommendation?

    • kquinley says:

      Rosemary, Good question. I have simply used a list of bullet-points showing month by month “deliverables,” projects and accomplishments that I could point to. You could set up a spreadsheet in Excel or a chart in Word, with a column for date and another one for a brief description of the accomplishment. Nothing fancy. Hope that helps!

Leave a Reply to Rosemary Silva Cancel reply

*

YouTube You Tube     Facebook Facebook     Twitter Twitter     Linked In Linked In
Disclaimer   |   Sitemap   |   CLM Advisors
Quinley Risk Associates, LLC © 2012. All Rights Reserved.
Website support provided by Aivilo Web Solutions, LLC.